Business 1, Lesson 85 – My Plan to Implement Carnegie’s Techniques in my Life

Writing assignment: 250 words on this topic: “My plan to implement one chapter in my life.”

Carnegie’s book has so many amazing techniques for not only business, but day to day life as well, which is why I will not implement just one, but many chapters in my life. These techniques will definitely be helpful for when I run my Airbnb business, but I can also use them to my advantage in dealing with people in my life, such as siblings, parents, friends, coworkers, and anyone else in my social circle.

I have come to realize that Carnegie’s methods can even be used in scenarios with small children, who are often a pain to look after. They cry, whine, tantrum, you cannot turn your back on them for a second, they need to be cleaned and fed, and are just high maintenance in general. But with just a few of Carnegie’s techniques, taking care of children can become a blast! Some of the techniques in question are: “Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely.”, “Make the mistake seem easy to correct.”, “Throw down a challenge.”, and “Don’t criticize, condemn, or complain.”

Let us start with the first approach I mentioned. “Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely.” Some ways you can do this with a kid is to let them win a boardgame or videogame a few times, or let them help you out with small tasks like cleaning or making sandwiches. In the end, the kid is happy, and you have one less headache.

“Make the mistake seem easy to correct.” Assume the child you are looking after accidentally shatters a vase or dumps a bag of flour, making a mess. Instead of yelling at them and punishing them, help them clean up and let them know that the vase can be replaced, and you can buy new flour. Of course, you do need to make sure they know not to do it again, but there are calm and gentle ways to do that. Help them right the wrong in a nice way, rather than a harsh, scary way.

As for “Throw down a challenge.”, children are reluctant to do chores, as would anyone be. But turn it into a game, or a challenge, and the kid will happily oblige. Tell them, “I’ll time how fast you can clean up these Legos.”, or “First one to finish their chores gets to watch an episode of ___.” Kids, as well as most people, will gladly take a challenge any day. You do not even have to limit this method to getting children to do chores. You can get them to do anything you want them to do, such as schoolwork or socializing. For example, “I bet you’re too shy to ask that little boy to play Legos with you.” This not only immediately benefits the child in terms of living in a clean, neat space, and having friends to learn social skills with, but it also instills in them a competitive nature that will help them overcome obstacles in the future. For example, if faced with a deadline for a school or work project, said child will have no problem finishing the project, as they are determined to complete the challenge.

And last but never least, “Don’t criticize, condemn, or complain.” One time, my younger cousin, about 4 at the time, drew a mermaid, and on her chest drew two circles. Upon being asked what they were, my cousin responded, “Her shoulders.” Instead of saying, “No, that’s not where shoulders go”, my family and I laughed a bit at the absurdity and said, “Good job!” You do not need to correct them at a young age, unless they are saying or doing something rude or inappropriate. They will learn when they grow. That same cousin, now 8, knows that shoulders do not belong in the center of a person’s chest. We did not need to fix her at 4 years old and dampen her spirit.

Children are tough to deal with, no question about that, but Carnegie teaches many, many ways to handle people that can be used just as well with kids. This results in cheery children, stress-free adults, and good spirits all around. It does not take much effort to implement these tactics when dealing with kids, so why not use them? Babysitters, parents, older siblings, and anyone else who may for some reason be caring for a child can all benefit from these techniques, and many more.


One thought on “Business 1, Lesson 85 – My Plan to Implement Carnegie’s Techniques in my Life

  1. Thank you for sharing this piece, Sofia. Carnegie was a brilliant man and had so much to teach us! I love how you see the benefits of the techniques later in life, but make a connection to how you can utilize them now. Great!! Take a look at the quotations used throughout your piece. A period and comma is not needed before ending the quote. Always a pleasure to read your work, Sofia!

    “My plan to implement one chapter in my life.”

    Carnegie’s book has so many amazing techniques for not only business, but day to day life (.) I will not implement just one (chapter,) but many chapters in my (own) life. These techniques will definitely be helpful for when I run my (own) Airbnb business in the future, but I can also use them to my advantage (now. When) dealing with people in my life, such as siblings, parents, friends, coworkers, and anyone else in my social circle (these techniques will be priceless).

    I have come to realize that Carnegie’s methods can even be used in scenarios with small children, who are often (difficult) to look after. They cry, whine, tantrum and you cannot turn your back on them for a second(.) (They) are just high maintenance in general(,as they need to be cleaned and fed often). With just a few of Carnegie’s techniques, taking care of children can become a blast! Some of the techniques in question are: “Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely,” “Make the mistake seem easy to correct,” “Throw down a challenge,” and “Don’t criticize, condemn, or complain.”

    Let us start with the first approach – “Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely.” Some ways you can do this with a kid is to let them win a board game or video game a few times. (Also, letting) them help you out with small tasks(,) like cleaning or making sandwiches (will make them feel needed). In the end, the kid is happy and you have one less headache.

    “Make the mistake seem easy to correct.” Assume the child you are looking after accidentally shatters a vase or dumps a bag of flour, making a mess. Instead of yelling at them and punishing them, help them clean up and let them know that the vase can be replaced and you can buy new flour. Of course, you do need to make sure they know not to do it again, but there are calm and gentle ways to do that. Help them right the wrong in a nice way, rather than a harsh, scary way.

    As for “Throw down a challenge,” children are reluctant to do chores, as (most people are). But (if you) turn it into a game, or a challenge, the kid will happily oblige. Tell them, “I’ll time how fast you can clean up these Legos,” or “First one to finish their chores gets to watch an episode of ___.” Kids, as well as most people, will gladly take a challenge any day. You do not even have to limit this method to getting children to do chores. You can get them to do anything you want them to do, such as schoolwork or socializing. For example, “I bet you’re too shy to ask that little boy to play Legos with you.” This not only immediately benefits the child in terms of living in a clean, neat space, and having friends to learn social skills with, but it also instills in them a competitive nature that will help them overcome obstacles in the future. For example, if faced with a deadline for a school or work project, the child will have no problem finishing the project, as they are determined to complete the challenge.

    And last but never least, “Don’t criticize, condemn, or complain.” One time, my younger cousin, about 4 at the time, drew a mermaid, and on her chest drew two circles. Upon being asked what they were, my cousin responded, “Her shoulders.” Instead of saying, “No, that’s not where shoulders go,” my family and I laughed a bit at the absurdity and said, “Good job!” You do not need to correct them at a young age, unless they are saying or doing something rude or inappropriate. They will learn (as) they grow. That same cousin, now 8, knows that shoulders do not belong in the center of a person’s chest. We did not need to fix her at 4 years old and dampen her spirit.

    Children are tough to deal with, no question about that(.) Carnegie teaches many, many ways to handle people that can be used just as well with kids. This results in cheery children, stress-free adults, and good spirits all around. It does not take much effort to implement these tactics when dealing with kids, so why not use them? Babysitters, parents, older siblings, and anyone else who may be caring for a child can benefit from these techniques.

    Like

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